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How To Track Your Bankruptcy Case Online

When you file for bankruptcy, you’re at the mercy of the court and your lawyer. Why not make it easier to get up-to-the-moment information?

Bankruptcy is a court proceeding, and it’s a public one.

Court documents are filed electronically, and the public has access to those records.

That’s good news for you because it means you can get information without having to go through your lawyer.

Public Access to Court Electronic Records

PACER, an acronym for Public Access to Court Electronic Records, is the electronic public access service of United States federal court documents.

Behind a simple username and password login, you can get case and docket information from the United States Bankruptcy Court.

Information You Can Find On PACER

When you log into the PACER system you can get pretty much everything in the court’s database. That includes:

  • your bankruptcy case number, filing date, and discharge or dismissal date;
  • copies of all bankruptcy documents, including the Notice of Commencement and Discharge of Debtor;
  • name of the judge and trustee;
  • names and addresses of creditor attorneys who have filed appearances;
  • copies of Proofs of Claims filed in your case;
  • court date (time, date and location) information; and
  • motions filed in your case.

PACER Costs And Sign Up Procedures

It doesn’t cost anything to sign up for PACER, but there’s a cost of $0.08 per page you retrieve. It’s not a large charge, but if you check the docket daily it can add up fast.

To sign up for a free PACER account, register by clicking here.

Why Sign Up For PACER?

If you filed for bankruptcy without a lawyer, you need to have a way to get information and data about your case. PACER is the only reputable and complete way of doing so.

Even if you have a lawyer, you may decide to sign up for PACER as a way of getting information more quickly. Once your bankruptcy case is closed, your lawyer may archive your file; getting copies of your paperwork may take some time.

Given the fact that it’s free to register and costs only a few cents per page, it makes sense to keep a PACER account in handy – just in case.

By |January 5th, 2014|

About the Author:

I've been a consumer protection lawyer since 1995, working to help people end their bill problems. I'm a faculty member at the Student Loan Law Workshop, a nationally recognized speaker, and a long-time member of both the National Association of Consumer Bankruptcy Attorneys and National Association of Consumer Advocates.
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